Recent Posts

The Creation of Adam: Michelangelo’s Masterpiece of Art

The Creation of Adam: Michelangelo’s Masterpiece of Art

The Creation of Adam is a wall painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, the Vatican City. This is an amazing art which depicts God giving life to Adam, the first man was created by Michelangelo around 1511. Michelangelo has astonished the world with…

Traditional Quintessence: Wood Scupture – The Pinnacle of Sculpture

Traditional Quintessence: Wood Scupture – The Pinnacle of Sculpture

A wood sculpture is also a very unique art form. Instead of painting on paper or silk materials, people sculpted and portrayed their wooden works of art. It brings the value of enjoyment that is enthralling to the enjoy. Referring to the art of wood…

Japanese Ceramics Follow The History Line

Japanese Ceramics Follow The History Line

Japan is a country that is well-known for its art culture and its long history. And when it comes to the unique art form, famous in the country of sunrise can not fail to mention the art of ceramics extremely unique here. Japanese ceramics are one of the oldest art forms in Japan, the art form dating back to Neolithic times, and the ceramics and porcelain products used in everyday life became popular.

Japanese ceramics are associated with many famous brands as well as famous artists such as Honami Koetsu, Ogata Kenzan … Since the 4th century, Japanese ceramics are strongly influenced by ceramics from China. and Korea. However, the Japanese ceramic artists have conveyed the value of foreign ceramic art into the traditional artistic values ​​characteristic of cherry blossom country. Until the 20th century, the ceramic industry in Japan remained strong.
In the Neolithic period, the first ceramic products appeared in the form of a rope. By the 3rd-4th century BC, ceramic products were still simple or no shape at all. Until the second century AD, ceramic products from China began to appear. They are fired at temperatures above 1,000 degrees Celsius. Three-color ceramic firing techniques have appeared in Japan since the Tang period, into the eighth century. In 1223, Chinese ceramics techniques were widely applied with ceramic products burned at high temperatures.


From the 11th to the 16th centuries, Japan imported many ceramic products from China such as white enamel, blue plates, and Japan also imported products from Korea and Vietnam. Japanese ceramics are clearly shown in the art of tea ceremony has a long tradition in cherry blossom country. Up to the 20th century, Japanese ceramics have changed a lot with today’s modern ceramics, combining traditional techniques with modern values.

With the skill, sophistication in thinking and technical skill, the Japanese artisans have put their ceramic products into a unique artwork that is equally beautiful. To obtain beautiful and quality ceramic products requires the artisan to undergo a rigorous academic process and accumulate experience over a long period of time. The ceramic products of the Japanese are brought to use in life somewhat better than the culture here. Japanese ceramics is a gift of high artistic value can be donated to friends and relatives after the trip in the country of sunrise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sand Painting – An Art Form Challenging The Creativity Of Artists

Sand Painting – An Art Form Challenging The Creativity Of Artists

To us, painting sand is still a new subject right? How many people know that it has also been included in the curriculum of some universities in the world? Many of you think that drawing with pen is often difficult, drawing with sand is harder.…

Traditional Australian Aboriginal Artworks

Traditional Australian Aboriginal Artworks

Art has been an integral part of human life. Art helps express the spirit, the culture of each region. This article elaborates how art contributes to the Australian Aboriginal communities from the past to the present days including spiritually, ritually and physically Australian lifestyle. Historical…

The Most Expensive Paintings In The World

The Most Expensive Paintings In The World

It should come as no surprise that most people around the world agree that the artwork found in private collections and museums across the globe are priceless. These unique paintings make it extremely difficult to place a price on them as well. However, nearly every single day, art is bought and sold which brings is staggering price tags that most of us will never be able to afford. Let’s take a look at some of the most expensive paintings in the world just to give you an idea of what we are talking about.

Leonardo Da Vinci – Mona Lisa


There’s no denying that the Mona Lisa is priceless. It’s nearly impossible to put a price on this masterpiece, but in 1962 the painting by Leonardo Da Vince was insured for $100 million which was the highest at the time. When you look at today’s money, this would be somewhere around $700 million, making it the most expensive painting in the world. The portrait is believed to be Lisa Gherardini who was the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, a Florentine cloth merchant.

Willem de Kooning – Interchange

In 2015, a billionaire hedge fund investor, Ken Griffin, procured two paintings from a successful business magnate, David Geffen, for a staggering $500 million. The first painting was the 1955 Interchange by Willem de Kooning. According to experts, the price of this abstract expressionist painting was valued at $300 million. Ken Griffin loaned Willem de Kooning’s painting to a museum allowing everyone has the opportunity to see it.

Paul Gauguin – Nafea Faa Ipoipo

In 1891, Paul Gauguin made his way to Tahiti where he fell in love with both the country and its women. In 1892, Paul Gauguin painted the Nafea Faa Ipoipo, a post-impressionist painting that depicted two women sitting in a landscape of blue, green, and gold. In 2015, this sensational artwork was in a private sale where it sold for around $300 million. Although the purchaser was never confirmed, most people believe it’s owned by the Qatar royal family.

Paul Cezanne – The Card Players


The Card Players painting forms part of a series of five which was produced by Paul Cezanne during his career. Most of his paintings are currently showcased in world-renowned museums, including London’s Courtauld Institute of Art, and Paris’ Musee D’Orsay. In 2012, art enthusiasts learned that the painting was privately sold for $250 million in 2011. In today’s money, that works out to $269 million. It’s been confirmed that the painting is in possession of the Qatar royal family.

Jackson Pollock – Number 17A

Do you remember the $500 million that was spent by Ken Griffin on two paintings from David Geffen’s collection? Well, this is the second painting he bought for a whopping $200 million. Jackson Pollock painted Number 17A in 1948 and features a wide range of bold colours, including orange blue, red, and yellow along with black and white splashes. Art enthusiasts can see the painting at the Art Institute of Chicago.

How the Queen Biopic Come to Life

How the Queen Biopic Come to Life

Since the release of the teaser trailer for Bohemian Rhapsody, the new Queen biopic, was released this May – it seemed as if the entire world got what they were asking for. Rami Malek, the star in the hit television show Mr. Robot, was cast…

The Top 5 Mo’Wax L.P’s

The Top 5 Mo’Wax L.P’s

Back in 1992 an ambitious young man named James Lavelle made a decision that would go on to change his life. He made a decision that would change how we consume music, the lifestyle that goes with music and most importantly he would create a…

An Interview With: Florence Blanchard

An Interview With: Florence Blanchard

Here at Kolekto, we’ve got our eyes firmly fixed on the blossoming creative scene in Sheffield. So it seemed only natural to chat with one of the city’s most brightly shining stars, painter and muralist Florence Blanchard. We caught up with the French artist to see how 2014 is wrapping up for her.

 

Hi Florence, nice to talk to you today! What are you up to at the moment?
I’ve just done an exhibition, Night visions, which is my first solo show in Sheffield in almost 3 years. All the work is new and some of it is inspired by my recent visit to Japan, where I completed a 350 m2 mural in Betsukai Hokkaido. The title of the show, Night Visions, refers to the dreamlike compositions that I often painted after dark onto circular black paper.  I have been working on this exhibition the whole year and I am very please with it. It includes some of the work I did in preparation for the current ‘Marvelosa’ exhibition  at the National Fairground Archive which also started in Sheffield in September and is on until January 2015. This is the perfect conclusion of a year full of really cool projects.

 

Where does your influence for working as a street artist stem from?
I find it hard to call myself a street artist because I started painting in the streets way before the term ‘street art’ appeared. I became a graffiti writer as a teenager influenced by the world wide phenomenon, which arrived in my home city in the late 80’s – early 90’s. Street art only appeared in the past 10 years.

 

Some say street art helps make art accessible to the masses, regardless of a person’s background or demographic. For this reason, would you say that it’s more important than work hung on gallery wall?
Honestly, in my opinion they are just two different aspects of the creative world, which are not comparable.

 

Do you think you’ll be painting murals all your life?
Simple answer: Yes.

 

What’s the best thing about being an artist?
The best thing is to be able to travel to exotic places and to never be bored.

 

Two great reasons… And the worst?
Everyone has different views on what art is or what being an artist means, which often makes things chaotic when you work with people for the first time.

 

Can you tell us a bit about your inspiration behind the ‘Blob’ and ‘Dropmen’ series?
The Dropmen arose from painting drops and blobs in the background of my graffiti pieces in the 90’s. These friendly characters sit in doorways and public paths witnessing street life as it goes by.

 

Where did your idea for the Particles murals come from?
The particles themselves are abstracted blob characters, they represent the molecules that our universe is made from. The ‘particle paintings’ generally have a full-bleed finish, signifying the false promise of infinity and matter that has no beginning and no end – a sort of mise en abyme for the viewer.

 

How do you see art in 2064, fifty years from now?
A bit like now but more futuristic.

 

 

What do you hope to achieve through your art?
Happiness.

 

Where is your ‘creative place’ when you’re most productive?
I like to be on my own to create works – either outside or in the studio. Generally in the evenings, and I avoid checking out blogs or magazines or other potential sources of procrastination.

 

And finally… If you were a font, which font would you be?
Dingbats with no hesitation.

Christmas Songs…With A Difference

Christmas Songs…With A Difference

Ahh Christmas, a time to put your feet up, roast some chestnuts on an open fire and sing carols with the family, at least that’s what people seem to think happens during this festive season, but does it really? Maybe in old 50’s movies, but…